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San Jacinto Blues No. 2 - George Lewis (2) - American Music By George Lewis (Vinyl, LP)

8 thoughts on “ San Jacinto Blues No. 2 - George Lewis (2) - American Music By George Lewis (Vinyl, LP)

  1. Eureka Brass Band - New Orleans Funeral & Parade Music (LP) AMCD Bunk Johnson - Rare and Unissued Masters Vol 2: AMCD/ George Lewis - New Orleans Stompers AMCD Bunk Johnson - Rare and Unissued Masters Vol 1: AMCD Wooden Joe Nicholas - Rare & Unissued Masters AMCD
  2. Oct 23,  · Check out San Jacinto Blues #2 by George Lewis on Amazon Music. Stream ad-free or purchase CD's and MP3s now on ratttaderppargemebarblarilquirecjee.co
  3. A centerpiece for the dedicated New Orleans collector, this begins with Lewis' "Climax Rag" session in and ranges through a variety of studio and concert performances ending 12 years later -- definitely some of the clarinetist's best work (, ).
  4. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Red Vinyl Vinyl release of American Music By George Lewis on Discogs.4/5(1).
  5. Dec 26,  · All That Jazz, Vol. George Lewis & Friends — Jam Session in New Orleans Licensed to YouTube by IODA, NaxosofAmerica, The Orchard Music (on behalf of Jube Legends); BMI - Broadcast Music Inc.
  6. Amazon Music Unlimited Prime Music CDs & Vinyl Download Store Settings CDs & Vinyl Stream George Lewis with Kid Shots by George Lewis and tens of millions of other songs on all your devices with Amazon Music Unlimited. Exclusive discount for Prime members. San Jacinto Blues. San Jacinto Blues. Listen Now $ 7. Sheik of Araby.5/5(6).
  7. American Music is the label to go to for the documentation of authentic New Orleans jazz by the legendary pioneers of the form… with greats such as Lizzie Miles, Bunk Johnson, George Lewis, Jim Robinson, Kid Ory, Baby Dodds, Leadbelly, Raymond Burke, Kid Thomas, Kid Howard, Alvin Alcorn, Punch Miller, Kid Sheik, Billie & De De Pierce, etc.
  8. GEORGE LEWIS Vinyl Records and CDs Clarinetist George Lewis, not to be confused with the avant-garde trombone player by the same name, stuck to the bubbly, bouncy collective improvisations of Dixieland his entire career, while his peers moved on to Swing and then to Bop.

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